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Event 25: The Sixteen with Harry Christophers

York Minster
Friday 12 July 7:30pm


Please note that online booking for this event has now closed. Tickets will be available on the door from one hour before the performance.

(Each year we complement our Choral Pilgrimage Tour with the opportunity to delve deeper into the rich history behind the repertoire. See The Sixteen Insight Day here)

Reserved seating front nave: £25.00 (front nave seats have now sold out)
Reserved seating rear nave: £18.00 (rear nave seats have now sold out)
Unreserved seating side aisles: £12.00 (students £5.00) available

The Queen of Heaven

plainsong           Regina caeli
PALESTRINA  Kyrie from Missa Regina caeli
 
ALLEGRI           Miserere    
 
MACMILLAN   Dominus dabit benignitatem (from The Strathclyde Motets)
MACMILLAN   Videns Dominus (from The Strathclyde Motets)
 
PALESTRINA   Stabat Mater  a 8
 
Interval
 
PALESTRINA    Regina caeli  a 8
 
PALESTRINA    Vineam meam non custodivi  (from Song of Songs)
MACMILLAN    O radiant dawn (from The Strathclyde Motets)
PALESTRINA    Pulchrae sunt genae tuae (from Song of Songs)
 
MACMILLAN    Miserere 
 
PALESTRINA    Agnus Dei I-III from Missa Regina caeli

The Sixteen returns to York with a programme focusing on a Mass – Missa Regina Caeli – by one of the most famous of all composers to have made their careers in Rome, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. Seen by many in his own time and since as a paragon of flawless and elegant Renaissance polyphony, he was employed by a number of leading Roman religious institutions, including the Sistine Chapel. Alongside the Mass and other exquisite works by Palestrina are the famous Allegri Miserere – once one of the Sistine Chapel's most jealously guarded secrets – and three motets by the leading contemporary Scottish composer James MacMillan.

"the choral sounds were wonderfully clear and unfailingly precise … Christopher's group can be just as impressively extrovert as they had been austerely restrained.” The Guardian


Please enter via the West Door.